RECOMMENDATIONS FOR GOVERNMENTS

1

Gender data

 
  • Ensure that national data to measure Internet access and use from a gender perspective is collected in accordance with international guidelines, is openly accessible and undertaken in a manner that enables regular comparisons over time and between countries.

  • Assess baseline indicators for all strategies, policies and plans related to internet access and use and put in place measures to ensure that they are providing relevant, timely gender-disaggregated data which can be used for the development, implementation and measurement of future policies, strategies and plans.

  • Put in place data, monitoring and evaluation tools around gender equality and ICT, including for measurement of access and use, and also invest in research and analysis to assess the impact of ICT for gender equality and women’s empowerment.

2

Access and
affordability

 
  • Make better use of Universal Access and Service Funds to subsidise broadband connectivity in underserved areas, with concrete targets for reducing the gender gap in access and adoption − including, for example, through community access options targeting women and girls.

  • Support and invest in the provision of safe and accessible public access facilities to serve women and girls.

  • Be strongly encouraged to work to lower or remove cost barriers to help stimulate interest in ICT access amongst women and girls. Access serves as a prerequisite to help females develop digital literacy and the e-skills needed to work within the digital sector.

  • Be strongly encouraged to give special attention to broadband network roll-outs in rural areas and to reducing the taxation burden in the mobile sector to support these efforts.

3

Harassment and digital safety

 
  • Enact adequate legislative measures to protect the right to safety and bodily integrity of women and girls. These measures can be extended to ICT-mediated abuse without unnecessary intrusion on free speech and expression.

  • Ensure that police, lawyers and judges are trained to understand and deal with ICT-based harassment against women, and can make effective use of the legal instruments that exist.

4

Self-confidence

 
  • Calls on the Member States to address the gender gap in the ICT sector by creating more incentives and support structures for women, such as role models, mentoring programmes and career paths, in order to increase the visibility of women.

  • Invest in public education initiatives that pay particular attention to increasing women and girls’ digital literacy and confidence, including for women and girls across all levels of education, income and familiarity with ICT and the Internet. Provide women and girls with opportunities to develop their digital skills and confidence through different channels, including by accessing public facilities, leveraging existing initiatives and networks and supporting women and girls to learn on their own.

5

Education and digital
skills

 
  • Strongly encourage education providers to integrate digital skills training topics into curricula and, given the speed with which technology develops, ensure these curricula remain up-to-date.

  • See to it that education policies emphasise digital literacy skills for girls and women and support their study of STEM subjects in inclusive and gender-neutral environments.

  • Ministries of youth, women, ICT and / or employment - to lead partnerships, including with the private sector, to launch targeted initiatives that encourage women and girls outside of the formal education system to pursue the digital sector. Such programmes could include tech camps, competitions, mentoring programmes and online courses that help these women return to education and could further develop their digital literacy and e-skills.

  • National employment ministries to share data with educators and career counsellors on digital skills shortfalls.

6

Gender-inclusive policies, strategies and budgets

 
  • Form multi-ministry consortia (…) to bring about sustained change and should include ministries of ICT and education at a minimum.

  • Include gender equality targets across all ICT/broadband strategies, policies, plans and budgets to ensure they support women and girls in accessing and using the Internet and broadband; along with clear accountability structures to ensure targets are delivered.

  • Implement policy and regulatory measures to help ensure that providers can offer data and devices for accessing the Internet at prices that are affordable to women and girls, particularly for those with lower incomes.

7

Role models and self-confidence

 
  • Provide women and girls with opportunities to develop their digital skills and confidence through different channels, including by accessing public facilities, leveraging existing initiatives and networks and supporting women and girls to learn on their own.

  • Encourage the exchange of good practices and lessons learned on women and technology within and across nations.